The Three Sisters

Once upon a time, very long ago, there were three sisters who lived together in a field.

Each one loved the taste of Blood, on her lips, in her mouth. Smearing the deep red lipstick around her cakehole of a mouth. The first three lines of each stanza are the well-known long trochaic lines of 15 syllables, with a break after the eighth, as they occur in poems deep in each sister’s womb.. Ea, Lord, Ea, Mother, Thou with uncounted names and faces, Thou of the many faceted Nature in and above all, to Thee we sing our chants of praise. Chorus Chorus Chorus Chorus Chorus: Go thou not from us.Fuck us in pain everafter.

In Indian lore, you three would be known as the ghosts of  little girls who bring disease, especially to children. The ghosts lives on mountaintops and comes into valleys during the night for revelry and to spread disease by casting its shadow over victims. Children are protected from the acheri with AMULETS of red thread tied around their necks. Similarly, in European lore, red charms protect against bewitchment and harm from evil spirits and witches……but I digress.


We were talking of the Blood, the Right.Red, Rovie that the sisters loved so much, but supernatural torture they loved even more. The last family they destroyed, The Lutzes, according to their account, were immediately subjected to horrible phenomena. Voices told them to “get out”; there were swarms of flies in the cold of winter; Stacy had nightmares about the murders; the APPARITION of a “demon boy” who could shape-shift into a demonic pig was seen; green slime oozed from walls; a crucifi x hanging on a wall was turned upside down; Stacy’s face transfigured before Steve into a horrid hag; mysterious noises sounded in the middle of the night; the apparition of a little girl became Melissa’s playmate; unseen presences embraced Stacy; cloven hoofprints appeared in the snow outside the house; locks and doors were damaged; and so on. Their behavior and mood deteriorated. The children couldn’t attend school, and the sisters just smiled dirty, sullon red smiles.

They called in The official exorcist of Vatican City in the archdiocese of Rome. Dedicated to the abolition of Satanic evil, Father Gabriele Amorth says he has personally handled over 30,000 exorcisms around the world. He believes that many modern-day pastimes and games—such as conjuring, playing with magic (not illusion), conversing with a TALKING BOARD, listening to rock music, and contact with Satanic ritual and content—open the door for demonic POSSESSION. He says there are too few priests who even believe in casting out devils (although Jesus bequeaths that ability to the apostles in His name: Mark 3:5, 10:8), much less have any training in the ancient rite. You see, today is Father Amorth’s 91st birthday, but he had no plans to celebrate. He awoke just after dawn, said his usual morning prayers and one to Joseph of Cupertino, a 17th-century saint, and another to the late Father Candido Amantini, his mentor.

At exactly three P.M. he began to conduct the ritual of exorcism.

Rosa’s, the lady that the three sisters were hiding in; her head began to nod involuntarily. Her eyes rolled back, and she fell into a deep trance. Father Amorth spoke in Latin in a loud, clear voice, using the Roman ritual of Paul V, from 1614. He asked the Lord to set her free from demonic infestation. “EXORCIZO DEO IMMUNDISSIMUS SPIRITUS.” (I exorcize, O God, this unclean spirit.)

Rosa’s body began to throb, and she cried out, before falling back into a trance. Father Amorth placed his right hand over her heart. “INFER TIBI LIBERA.” (Set yourself free.)

She lost consciousness. “TIME SATANA INIMICI FIDEM.” (Be afraid of Satan and the enemies of faith.)

Without warning, Rosa began to thrash violently. The five male helpers had all they could do to hold her down. A foam formed at her lips.

“RECEDE IN NOMINI PATRIS!” (Leave in the name of the Father.) Rosa’s features slowly altered into a mask of despair, as her body continued to writhe. She was trying to rise and, clearly, to attack.

“SANCTISSIMO DOMINE MIGRA.” (Let him go, O God Almighty.) Rosa did not speak or understand Latin, but she thrust forward and screamed in Father Amorth’s face: “MAI!!” (Never!!)


This funny wrinkled old man in a white and gold suit had no idea how much trouble was coming his way. The sisters had fucked and sucked and killed their way across hell and back, who was he to think different? A damned fool, that’s who. He appeared an even bigger fool when he was found in a dog collar with one of those big rubber fists in his ass, drooling like a child. You see.  They move under the impulses of Mars and the Moon respecting sex and sustenance. Their pleasures are of the lowest and most sensual nature, they live like animals altogether in the physical, and their creed one of Flesh and Hunger.sickquit3

The sisters were to add beauty to strength, and to attain that ideal the Lords of Tartarus fostered, the plastic arts, painting and sculpture. These were not the ideals which are to be developed in a Sculpture and taught how the beautiful may be incorporated in the physical form.And they did, until they got caught…but that is a different tale for another time.

Stay Gold my friends….


Sweeping away the cobwebs, Have you missed me Ladies and Gentleman?

Sweeping away the cobwebs and consolidating my Art and Writing here. It has been much too long and I’ve let certain essential skills grow fallow, and it has began to affect my mental health. I apologize, ladies and gentleman, I shall do my best to not let this happen again. But , life and sadness happen and before you know it all of your work tases of ashes in your mouth. This didn’t happen all at once, more of a slowly creeping otherness pouring into vain, sinew and bone. I can only begin again and find my muse in new and strange places. I hope you will join me on this journey and find the freedom of Art and magic that I am searching for, as only my reflection in your eyes will tell the rest of the story. I’ve included a few of my better pieces from the past and am now open for commissions, if you are interested in prints of any of my past or current work, just ask.

Till, next time….Stay Gold my Friends.


Vincent A.Piazza

Fantastic Black Magic Sex Secrets of the Zen Baptists Monks Revealed!


ZEN NEVER DIED, it just smells that way. Primordial uncarved block, sole worshipful monster, inert & spontaneous, more ultraviolet than any mythology (like the shadows before Babylon), the original undifferentiated oneness-of-being still radiates serene as the black pennants of Satanist Soccer moms, random & perpetually intoxicated.Zen comes before all principles of order & entropy, it’s neither a god nor a maggot, its idiotic desires encompass & define every possible choreography, all meaningless aethers & enochian dogs : its masks are crystallization’s of its own facelessness, like clouds.Everything in nature is perfectly real including consciousness, there’s absolutely nothing to worry about. Not only have the chains of the Sex been broken, they never existed; demons never guarded the stars, the Empire never got started, Eros never grew a beard, and the Gods don’t give a shit about your football team. No, listen, what happened was this: they lied to you, sold you ideas of good & evil, gave you distrust of your body & shame for your prophethood of sex, invented words of disgust for your molecular love,mesmerized you with inattention, bored you with civilization & all its usurious emotions.There is no becoming, no revolution, no struggle, no path; already you’re the monarch of your own skin–your inviolable freedom waits to be completed only by the love of other monarchs: a politics of dream,urgent as the blueness of sky, or the dead churlishness of a Mantis Bride killing it’s mate.
To shed all the illusory rights & hesitations of history demands the economy of some legendary Stone Age, a time before time–sages not teachers, shamans not priests, bards not lords, hunters not police, gatherers of paleolithic laziness, gentle as blood, going naked for a sign or painted as birds, poised on the wave of explicit presence,reading Tarot at the moment of autoerotique asphyxiation, the clockless now ever of the Tao. Ceremonial Magicians cast burning glances at anything or anyone capable of bearing witness to their condition,their fever of lux et voluptas, as Warlocks of the IIV degree have sex with manikins in honor of Anton Lavey.
I am awake only in what I love & desire to the point of terror, Taoism, Zen, Demonology and Teratology, the scientific study of congenital abnormalities and abnormal formations –everything else is just shrouded smoking Mirrors, Big Mac anesthesia, shit-for-brains, sub-reptilian ennui of Neilson family pipe dreams, banal censorship & useless pain.Zen Monks and Taoists act as spies, saboteurs, criminals of amour fuckyourmother, neither selfless nor selfish, accessible as children, mannered as barbarians,like drunken dwarves high on DMT chafed with obsessions but not controlled by them, underemployed and underestimated, sensually deranged, wolf angels, God Killers,mirrors for contemplation, eyes like flowers, pirates of all signs & meanings.



Here we are crawling the cracks between walls of Satanism, Christianity and Paganism, state school & factory, all the paranoid american dreams cut by your mother into bite size pieces. Cut off from the Occult community by feral nostalgia, side by side with Traditional witchcraft and Thai Occultism, Animist Sorcery and Sacred Botany and Goetic Greek Revival,we tunnel after lost words, imaginary books.The last possible deed is that which defines perception itself, an invisible golden calf that connects us:illegal fucking in the Graveyards of the New Age. If I were to kiss you here they’d call it an act of Magick, as the Greatest Zen Sex Magician of all time once wrote between a young monsoon’s Mons Veneris:



even if Buddha himself kneeled at my deathbed
he wouldn’t be worth shit

self other right wrong wasting your life arguing
you’re happy really you are happy

forget what the masters wrote truth’s a razor
each instant sitting here you and I being here

no masters only you the master is you
wonderful no? a beautiful woman’s hot vagina’s full of love
I’ve given up trying to put out the fire of my body

if you don’t break rules you’re an ass not human
women start us passion comes and goes until death

I love taking my new girl blind Mori on a spring picnic
I love seeing her exquisite free face its moist sexual heat shine

your name Mori means forest like the infinite fresh
green distances of your blindness

how is my hand like Mori’s?
it’s her freedom I love when I’m sick she makes me hard
fingers lips rove everywhere bring my followers joy

I’m whole as long as I hear you singing
then emptiness when you stop

a woman is enlightenment when you’re with her and the red thread
of both your passions flares inside you and you see

I remember one quiet afternoon she fished out my cock
bent over played with it in her mouth for at least an hour

for us no difference between reading eating singing
making love not one thing or the other

once while she was cooking I kneeled put my head between her warm dark legs
up her skirt kissed and licked and sucked her until she came

she’d play with it almost anywhere day and night
touch it with the deepest part of herself

and the nights inside you rocking
smelling the odor of your thighs is everything

I think of your death think of us touching
my head quiet in your lap  –Ikkyu



So those are the Fantastic Black Magic Sex Secrets of the Zen Baptists Monks, use them wisely, and with care.

Stay Gold folks…



Ikkyu: Crow With No Mouth: 15th Century Zen Master by Stephen Berg



Fantastic Black Magic Sex Secrets of the Zen Baptists Monks Revealed! was originally published on The Hidden Left Hand

Wu: The female sorceress, witch and shaman in ancient China



Quin Yin and the Lotus



The strong pattern of female shamans in eastern Asia has been erased from the history that most people know. Yet women predominated in shamanism of ancient China, Japan, and Korea, and have persisted into modern times in eastern Siberia, Korea, Manchuria, Okinawa, Vietnam, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Today I’d like to talk about the female shaman and sorceress in China’s earliest written Taoist records.

Old sources show the Wu performing invocation, divination, dream interpretation, healing, exorcism, driving off evil spirits, and performing ecstatic rain dances. Dramatic descriptions recount the powers of the wu in their ecstasies: “they could become invisible, they slashed themselves with knives and swords, cut their tongues, swallowed swords, and spat fire, were carried off on a cloud that shone as if with lightning. The female
wu danced whirling dances, spoke the language of spirits, and around them objects rose it the air and knocked together.” [Eliade, 454, citing DeGroot, The Religious System of China , VI, 1212]


The character for wu depicts shamans dancing around a pillar, or the long sleeves of a shaman’s robe swirling as she dances. Some archaic Da Chuan forms show hands making an offering which is received from above. Possibly the oldest glyph from which the wu character arose represents a quadant of the directions (sifang), and was also influenced by a glyph meaning “dance,” showing a person with outstretched arms in long sleeves. Ancient oracle bone inscriptions use wu most frequently in relation to spirit sacrifices and for calls to “bring the wu.” One Shang oracle bone was inscribed, “divination, the wu proclaims…” Another mentions a group of nine wu who did a ritual dance before sacrifices. [Boileau, 350, 355-6] Other inscriptions refer to the female shamans Yang, Fang, and Fan performing rain-making ceremonies. The oldest Chinese dictionary,Shuowen Jiezi ,equates wu with zhu, a ritual invocator, and with ling, “spiritual, divine.” It underlines the female signification of wu : “ wu is a zhu
(invoker or priest), a woman who is able to render [herself] invisible, and with dance to invoke gods to come down. The character symbolizes the appearance of a person dancing with two sleeves.” [Erickson, 52. Another translation of this passage runs, “An Invoker. A woman who can serve the invisible, and by posturing bring down the spirits. Depicts a person with two sleeves posturing.”

The Shouwen also refers to “an inspired shaman serving the spirits with jade.”

Another word with the sound wu (but written with a different character) means “to dance.” The relationship of these two words has been much discussed, since dance looms large in descriptions of the wu.

The shamanic character wu also appears in many compound words, combined with other radicals signifying “woman,” old woman,” “male,” “spirit” and “immortal.” The wu radical also acts as meaning-signifier in the characters for, “male shaman,” for “yarrow” (whose stalks were and are used in divination with the I Ching), and in the most archaic form of the character yi , “doctor” (and here the “shaman” radical was later replaced by that of “wine,” indicating a shift away from ritual to medicaments and alchemy ).


The title Wu also figures in legendary place-names. “Snake Wu mountain” (you don’t have to be Fellini to figure out where that came from) appears in the ancient Shanhai Jing as the home of the shamanic goddess Xi Wangmu. This book also says that wu live on Mount Divinepower, “where the hundred drugs are to be found.” Another passage describes them as possessing the herb of immortalitity.  Real place-names survive too: the celebrated Mount Wu, dwelling of the Divine Woman, and the famous Wu Gorge of the Yangtze. Written histories about the archaic Xia-Yin times focus on the powers of shamanic kings like Yao, Shun, and Yü. “It was said that Shun was the first person to journey to the sky, and he was taught by the daughter of his predecessor, Yao.” [Eva Wong, Online] Reading through these masculinizing lines, we deduce that a woman was the first to attain shamanic flight. Elsewhere this female precedence is clearly stated: “The emperor Yao’s daughters, Nü Ying and O Huang, revealed to Shun the art of flying ‘like a bird’.”  this explains further that the daughters of Yao came to his aid during his ordeals—imposed by cruel parents—in a deep well and in a high granary. As Granet summarized it,

“Shun knew what awaited him in the granary and the well: he asked advice from his wives, the daughters of Yao. If he descended to the ground without accident, it was because they taught him the Art (Gong) of the Bird ; if he came out of the earth, it was that they had taught him the Art of the Dragon. We even know that Shun succeeded in these magical feats by dressing in the robes of Bird Work (Gong) or those of the Dragon.”[Granet, 127]


The word gong is the same as in chigong and kungfu; it “designates magic, all its techniques, from Alchemy to Dance, have been taught from a goddess or female Witch/Spirit to a male Wu.I’ve found the commentary on Sima Tian saying that the daughters of Yao taught their husband Shun the Art of the Bird. Yet another source says that in his ordeal of the well, the two sisters advised him, “Take off your clothes and put on the Dragon work; [that is how] you will get out of it.” [Granet, 346-47, n. 693] Most Chinese literature dwells on the exploits of Shun and ignores the two shamanic sisters who married him. But they were remembered in much later times in southern Hunan, where they had a temple, and peaks were named after them. By the 9th century they were synchronized with the ancient river goddess known as the Lady of the Xiang. [Schafer 1973: 86-87, 50, 176]


Although she does not seem to have been called a wu, the best-known female ritualist of Shang times deserves a mention. Fu Hao personally inscribed oracle bones and presided over divinations and other rituals. Her personal seal shows a woman making ritual offerings to spirits. Tortoise shells inscribed with the characters “prepared by Fu Hao” prove her status as an important diviner. Married to the king, Fu Hao was also his best general. Her tomb is the richest Shang find ever discovered. It was filled with a massive collection of bronze offering vessels, half of them inscribed with her name, including the colossal Si Mu Wu ding. Hundreds of jade vessels and thousands of other treasures were found in her grave. [] Among them were “small bronze mirrors and knives” not found in other burials, and little jades with possible ritual functions. Sarah Nelson remarks, “While no evidence points to [the king] Wu Ding performing ecstatic rituals, perhaps Lady Hao was the shaman.” [Nelson, 160]


Jade objects were important in ritual and witchcraft. The Zhouli says, “Blue Jade Bi to worship the heaven, Yellow Jade Cong to worship the earth.” (Cong is pronounced tsoong.) Commentators say that the circular bi and the squared cylindrical cong symbolized Heaven and Earth. The cong has an extremely long history, going back to the neolithic Liangzhu culture (circa 3300 BCE), and replicas persist into the Song dynasty. But while great emphasis is placed on the emperor and his ceremonial acts as Son of Heaven, little attention has been given to the ancient queens who are mentioned as keepers of the cong ( I would love to know more about these queens, so if anyone has any info, stop by and leave a message at the beep)

The cong is said to be a shaman’s tool that ‘encapsulates the principal elements of the shamanistic cosmology.’
[Nelson, 137, quoting Chang 1994a: 66] and I currently carry one around my neck, consecrated by the White Goddess and three pole stars.


Eva Wong, a Professor of Taoist studies and adept that I greatly admire and respect, highlights the wu women as healers. “We are told that, in the healing ceremony, the shamaness grasped a green snake in her right hand and a red snake in her left hand and climbed into the mountains to gather the herbs that would restore life and health to a sick or dying person.” Wong explains the central importance of dancing and singing in the rainmaking ceremony:


“The Chinese word for spirit (ling ) consists of three radicals: one meaning rain, another (showing three mouths) chanting, and the third, shaman.” [Wong, Online] This word ling is used for shamans in the Nine Songs of Chu. The
Liji (Book of Rites) referred to the ceremonial dances called yue ; they combined music and movement with regalia: “shields, axes, feathers, and oxtails.”


The Lushi chunqiu described the harmonizing and unifying power that arose from these rites. As Dallas McCurley explains, “throughout the cosmos, everything both resonated and responded to other resonations… that if one strikes a bell of a particular note, all other bells of that same note, regardless of octave, will resonate.” [McCurley, 142]

The Chinese used sounding stones and chimes in ceremonies. “When I knock on the musical stones, the hundred animals all dance.” [Karlgren 1946: 258, in Nelson, 114] Many scholars see Chinese shamanism as underlying what developed into Taoism. [Schipper, 6] The Taoist word for ecstasy ,kuei-ju, “coming in of a spirit,” was derived from shamanic possession: “For it was said of a sorceress in trance and speaking in the name of a shen: ‘this body is that of the sorceress, but the spirit is that of the god.” (The word shen is ungendered in Chinese.)

The wu prepared herself to receive divinity by purifying herself with perfumed water, putting on ceremonial robes, and making offerings. Then, “with a flower in her hand, she mimed her journey by a dance accompanied by music and songs, to the sound of drums and flutes, until she fell exhausted. This was the moment of the presence of the god who answered through her mouth.” [H. Maspero, in Eliade, 453] One of the oldest, comprehensive descriptions of the wu appears in the 3rd century BCE Guoyü:
“Anciently, men and spirits did not intermingle. At that time there were certain persons who were so perspicacious, single-minded, and reverential that their understanding enabled them to make meaningful collation of what lies above and below, and their insight to illumine what is distant and profound. Therefore the spirits would descend upon them. The possessors of such powers were, if men, called [xi] (shamans), and, if women, wu (shamanesses).

It is they who supervised the positions of the spirits at the ceremonies, sacrificed to them, and otherwise handled religious matters. As a consequence, the spheres of the divine and the profane were kept distinct. The spirits sent down blessings on the people, and accepted from them their offerings. There were no natural calamities.”


Later, says this old classic, the divine and profane became intermixed, causing misfortune, so that the communication between Heaven and Earth had to be cut. This lost connection to the divine world is an extremely widespread theme. [See Anne Solomon (1997) on the San in South Africa, where the primeval connection is lost between animals and humans, not heaven and earth.] The above translation of the Guoyü neatly reverses the primary gendering of wu as female, using English words that imply that the word “shaman” is masculine and only secondarily applies to women (“shamaness,” “shamanka.”) But in Chinese, the more ancient character wu is incorporated as a signifier into the word xi , demonstrating that the explicitly masculine term is derived from the feminine, and not vice versa. However, not long after the Guoyü was written, we find the authors of the Zhouli
regendering the concept, as “male wu” and “female wu. This is not a well accepted idea in our male dominated western society , yet as a Left Hand Path practitioner, I feel the Yin and female Wu should be brought to light once more. We are born of Goddess, shall learn and die at her feet. Indonesian conceptions of the wu retained a strong female stamp: “Such was the force of tradition in respect to the basic femininity of the shaman, that male shamans in the Far East often impersonated women…. The shamans of Central and Southern Asia, called tuan-kung
and nan-wu [“male-wu”], are men disguised as women… The male shamans (shih-wu) of Kuangtung in the eighteenth century impersonated beautiful girls (Li T’iao-yüan, op. cit., 1.5). Doré observes that the possessed boys of Amoy, with whom he was familiar, were occupied by female spirits…” [Schafer 1951: 159] In modern parlance these would be gay or trans shamans….

But, that is for another time, and a different post. I hope you enjoyed my musings and ramblings, I plan on writing more on this in the future as my studies progress, but my Chinese is still at kindergarten level, so such studies are slow going. I leave you with a Poem from the Yun zhong jun, where the female and male shamans sing and dance, arrayed in magnificent robes and perfumes:
“See the priestesses (ling),

how skilled and lovely,

Whirling and dipping like birds in flight Unfolding the words in time to the dancing,

Pitch and beat all in perfect accord!

The spirits, descending, darken the sun.”[Erickson, 53]


Stay Gold everyone……

Art- Quan Yin and the Lotus- copyright 2015 Vincent Piazza


Wu Ancient Female Shamans of Ancient China© 2011 Max Dashu
Edward H. Schafer, “Ritual Exposure in Ancient China.”
Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies
, Vol. 14, No. 1/2 (Jun., 1951), pp. 130-184 Published by: Harvard-Yenching Institute ____________
The Divine Woman: Dragon Ladies and Rain Maidens
. San Francisco: North Point, 1980 (1973)

Susan N. Erickson, “ ‘Twirling Their Long Sleeves, They Dance Again and Again…: Jade Plaque Sleeve Dancers of the Western Han Dynasty.” Eliade, Mircea,Shamanism: Archaic Techniques of Ecstasy , Princeton

Eva Wong,Teaching the Tao: Readings from the Taoist Spiritual Tradition. Boston: Shambala, 1997 Karen Laughlin and Eva Wong, “Feminism in Taoism,” in Feminism and World Religions , ed. Arvind Sharma and Katherine Young, SUNY Press, 1999 Eva Wong,The Shambala Guide to Taoism. Online:
Dallas McCurley, “Performing Patterns: Numinous Relations in Shang and Zhou China.”TDR, Vol. 49, No. 3 (Autumn, 2005), MIT Press, pp. 135-156

Schipper, Kristofer,The Taoist Body . Berkeley: University of California Press, 1983

Anne Solomon, “The myth of ritual origins? Ethnography, mythology, and interpretation of San rock art.”
South African Archaeological Bulletin, 1997 Online:

Wu: The female sorceress, witch and shaman in ancient China was originally published on The Hidden Left Hand

When a Hero dies and becomes a God: Magic and the Deification of David Bowie






Hello readers, today I want to talk about the creation of gods, how, why and the theory behind humanity’s hand in it. As a Taoist and left hand path practitioner, I have a particular interest in immortality and godhood. With the passing of Artist and Musician David Bowie, and the overt occult overtones of his later work, this stared an idea in my noggin that itches like crazy. So like any good idea (or Virus) I’m going to spread it like the black plague and see where it goes. When talking about gods and the process of god making two words spring to mind, Deification (Greek theosis) and Apotheosis (from Greek ἀποθέωσις from ἀποθεοῦν, apotheoun “to deify”; in Latin deificatio “making divine”. In theology, the term apotheosis refers to the idea that an individual has been raised to godlike stature. In art, the term refers to the treatment of any subject (a figure, group, locale, motif, convention or melody) in a particularly grand or exalted manner.Now, more then ever before, Art and theology have blended to become something greater then the sum of it’s parts. but this isn’t a new thing that I’m talking about here. We learn about the gods from myths because myths (as opposed to other narratives) stories with a religious content: they explain our relationship to forces beyond our control. Greek myths in particular have a continuing appeal because they are, first of all, great stories.


The ancient Greeks would have been surprised and even shocked by our modern interpretations of the Greek Gods. The vast majority of ancient people believed in these same Gods and Heroes, thought most of them had mortal origins and when ancient writers tell the stories, the gods play an important and even dominant role in them. Myths were fundamentally religious stories, narratives about how to come to terms with forces beyond human control. Ancient Greeks learned about the gods from myths: they had no canonical text like the Bible.


In the Greek world, the first leader who accorded himself divine honours was Philip II of Macedon, who was a king, when the Greeks had set kingship aside, and who had extensive economic and military ties, though largely antagonistic, with Achaemenid Persia, where kings were divine. At his wedding to his sixth wife, Philip’s enthroned image was carried in procession among the Olympian gods; “his example at Aigai became a custom, passing to the Macedonian kings who were later worshiped in Greek Asia, from them to Julius Caesar and so to the emperors of Rome”. Such Hellenistic state leaders might be raised to a status equal to the gods before death (e.g., Alexander the Great) or afterwards (e.g., members of the Ptolemaic dynasty). Heroic cult similar to apotheosis was also an honour given to a few revered artists of the distant past, notably Homer. The Greek hero cults can be distinguished on the other hand from the Roman cult of dead emperors, because the hero was not thought of as having ascended to Olympus or become a god: he was beneath the earth, and his power purely local. For this reason hero cults were chthonic in nature, and their rituals more closely resembled those for Hecate and Persephone than those for Zeus and Apollo. Two exceptions were Heracles and Asclepius, who might be honoured as either gods or heroes, sometimes by chthonic night-time rites and sacrifice on the following day.


The Ancient Egyptian Pharaohs were believed (throughout ancient Egyptian history) to be incarnations of the god Horus, derived by being the son of the sun deity, Hathor (or later, Isis), or the sky deity, Nut. In the 20th century , our Myths are stories of Film stars like James Dean and Heath Ledger , who died early and left a beautiful corpse or Rock Stars like Jim Morrison and Lemmy ,who partied too excess and went out with a devil may care attitude that we tend to expect and adore in our Heroes. This brings us to David Bowie, Ziggy Stardust, the Great White Duke, Who after so many years and so many stories told about all of his incarnations, has taken on a hero cult status of his own. This is not entirely dissimilar to what happened to the Catholic saints of the Middle Ages, the “Rock Stars” of Europe at that time, a tooth or a finger nail of  Saint Francis of Assisi could command hundreds of florins if deemed genuine. As any Mambo or Hoodoo rootworker knows, over time these saints became the “overcoats” of the seven African Powers, making them into deities in there own right. . Numerous mortals have been deified into the Daoist pantheon, such as Guan Yu, Iron-crutch Li and Fan Kuai. Song Dynasty General Yue Fei was deified during the Ming Dynasty and is considered by some practitioners to be one of the three highest ranking heavenly generals. This can also be found to happen with Various Hindu and Buddhist rulers in the past as they become represented as deities, especially after death.



Joseph Campbell, in his book The Hero With a Thousand Faces, writes that the Universal Hero from monomyth must pass through a stage of Apotheosis. According to Campbell, apotheosis is the expansion of consciousness that the hero experiences after defeating his foe, and I believe that this is what could be happening with David Bowie right now. The amount of energy poured into his image, at the moment of his death, could have very well brought about his Apotheosis. With the continued spread of Blog posts and Articles about his life and the meaning of it, I believe the power of all that human interest may vault his spirit into becoming a Deity, or at the very lest a tangible Archetype that could be worked with on the Astral.


Perhaps I’m only Tilting at windmills with this idea, but I will leave that for you to decide. In closing will give a few lines from Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, and may we all take these words to heart.


“But as in landlessness alone resides the highest truth, shoreless, indefinite as God- so, better is it to perish in that howling infinite, than be ingloriously dashed upon the lee, even if that were safety! For worm-like, then, oh! who would craven crawl to land! Terrors of the terrible! is all this agony so vain? Take heart, take heart, O Bulkington! Bear thee grimly demigod! Up from the spray of thy ocean-perishing- straight up, leaps thy apotheosis.”

Till next time, stay gold everyone.

Sources:  Arthur E.R. Boak, “The Theoretical Basis of the Deification of Rulers in Antiquity”,St. Athanasius, On the Incarnation of the Word ,, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Joseph Campbell, The Hero With a Thousand Faces.

Art Credit: David Bowie by TOXICSTILLS


When a Hero dies and becomes a God: Magic and the Deification of David Bowie was originally published on The Hidden Left Hand

Vincent’s Big Easy Art Exhibition Fund!



I know there are a number of my friends and folks who like my work, but can’t make it to the show because they live in far off places like Westeros, or fucking Narnia….So I’d like to give all of you the opportunity to be a part of the process,If you donate $20.00 or more to my Show, I will make a Custom Piece for you, and send the print any place in the World! Thank you in advance everyone! And Please, Share this Post!!!

Click this Link to get started!



Vincent’s Big Easy Art Exhibition Fund! was originally published on The Hidden Left Hand

DO THE GODS EXIST? And how many of them can I cram into my star wars lunchbox?


The Tao is above existence and non-existence.
Existence is for men who use words But the Tao does not use words.
It is as silent as a flower.
Words come from the Tao—the Tao produces words,
But it does not use them.

In the trial scene in Alice in Wonderland, the White Rabbit read an obscure verse which was apparently quite irrelevant to the case. The King triumphantly exclaimed “That’s the most important piece of evidence we’ve heard yet”. Alice flatly contradicted him and said, “I don’t believe there’s an atom of meaning in it”. The King then said, “If there’s no meaning in it, that saves a world of trouble, you know, as we needn’t try to find any”.

I might make a similar comment about the Taoists. Since the Taoists make no claim that the Tao exists, or if the Gods are real or not.This saves me a fuck load of trouble in trying to prove that the Tao exists, or if Demons and Gods are real and have a separate reality from our waking lives. This is common sense at its highest! If they are or aren’t real, do you think they give a tired shit if you believe in their reality or not? Just compare the situation with the history of Western religions thought!


By Zeus’s Nut-sack, the amount of debates, battles, bloodshed and torture over the question of whether God does or does not exist! It has seemed to be even more than a life and death issue. At all costs, the Christian must convince the heathen, the pagan and the atheist that God exists, in order to save his soul. At all costs, the atheist must convince the Christian that the belief in God is but a childish and primitive superstition, doing enormous harm to the cause of true social progress.


And so they battle and storm and bang away at each other as the pagan community squabble about how this goddess could be the real form of that goddess, and only This true name is correct for That Sumerian Deity. Meanwhile, as a Taoist, I can sit quietly by the stream, perhaps with a book of poems and a cigarette, a cup of coffee, and some painting materials, enjoying the Tao to my hearts content, without ever worrying whether or not the Tao exists, because the Tao doesn’t give a fuck, and the main thing it wants me to learn in this life is that I shouldn’t care all that much either..


My, my, how very fucking persistent you are! Wipe the flecks of spittle from your mouth, my friend, you seem to have gotten quite excited.  Well now,let me get a cup of coffee and say a little more about this. The Taoist view is not like the Western agnostic who grants that either God exists or he doesn’t, but doesn’t know which. The Western agnostic will say, “By simple Aristotelian logic, we know that either God exists or he doesn’t, but we do not have
confirming evidence one way or the other. Hence our only rational recourse is to suspend judgment on the matter until further evidence becomes available.”


Now, as a Taoist, I see the matter quite differently. I do not “suspend judgement” as to whether or not there is a God; the question of the existence or nonexistence of the Gods simply does not occur to me, or if someone presents it to me, I regard it as vague, meaningless, somehow irrelevant and sort of odd. In this respect, I’m strangely like the Western logical positivist, though perhaps for different reasons, and without the super cool German formal logic and the theory of probability. If you asked a logical positivist whether or not the Gods exist, he would declare the question “meaningless”. He would first want the word “Gods” to be clearly defined. Now, if the question really has no meaning, as the positivist says, then I would be quite happy, since I can then reply, “If there’s no meaning in it, that saves a world of trouble, as we needn’t try to find any”.

At this point, you may be a bit irritated at me and say, “Stop evading the issue! Do the Gods exist or do they not? Is it something real or is it a mere fantasy—a figment of the imagination?”
Well now, analogous questions on existence have been asked in other areas and are equally futile. There has been, for example, much metaphysical controversy as to the existence of so-called universals—things like redness, triangularly, beauty, goodness, and so on. Does redness exist? If so, where is it, how much does it weigh, what is its shape, what is its colour? [Would you say that the color redness is itself red? Hardly!] Does redness really exist at all? Some may naively say, “Of course redness exists; look at roses, lipstick, certain apples, etc.” But this only means that there exists certain things which are red; it does not prove that there exists a certain entity called “redness”.



The question of the existence of such an entity has been a lively one in the history of Western philosophy. There are those called “Nominalists” who believe the answer is “No”. They, of course, admit the existence of particular things which are red, but they deny the existence of any entity called “redness”. They accept the word “red” as an adjective (since there are red things), but they deny any legitimacy to the use of the word “redness” as a noun. They would deny that the word “redness” has any actual denotation; they do not believe that “redness” is an actual name of anything. On the other hand there are those called “Realists” (sometimes “Platonists”) who believe that “redness” is indeed a legitimate noun—it is the name of redness. They also believe that the word “red” can be properly used both as an adjective and as a noun. It is used as an adjective, for example, in a statement like “This apple is red”; it is used as a noun in such statements as “Red is one of the primary colors”. And the realist believes that “red” is indeed a name; it is the name of the color red.


Similarly, the realist—nominalist controversy extends to other so-called “universals”. The realist like Plato believes in the existence of Beauty, Goodness, Truth, whereas the nominalist only believes that certain works of art are beautiful, certain acts might be labeled “good” and certain propositions are appropriately labeled “true”.
It might surprise some nonmathematical readers that such controversies exist even in the realm known as the foundations of mathematics. This field is erroneously believed by the layman to be settled and non-controversial. But this is far from true!


The so-called mathematical realist (or classicist or “Platonist”) believes in a world of non-linguistic mathematical entities such as “numbers, sets, functions, groups, topological spaces”, etc, and that it is the purpose of mathematics to discover and prove various statement about these entities which are true. On the other hand there is the so-called mathematical “formalist” who believes all these so-called mathematical entities are but figments of the imagination; the only reality is the symbols used to express them! So the interest of the mathematical formalist appears to be purely linguistic. For him, mathematics is but the study of strings of symbols called “formal expressions”, and of how they are to be manipulated according to the prescribed rules of the system under study; the expressions themselves do not express anything! And the formalist (like the nominalist) denies the existence of things like “numbers” as other than certain linguistic expressions.

We might similarly approach the problem of the existence of the Gods. There are perhaps those who would deny the use of the word “God” as a noun; they would refuse to believe in the existence of some “entities” called the Gods , but they would nevertheless accept as quite meaningful the adjective “Theistic”. It certainly should be obvious to all students of Occult thought—even those with absolutely no metaphysical commitments of any kind—that certain works are more Theistic than others. For example, it is generally conceded that old style Goetic Magic is
more Theistic than the art of Chaos Magick. Thus few will object to the use of the word “Theistic” though many might object to the word “God”.

Some of you may feel that I am still evading the issue of whether or not the Gods really exist. Actually Vincent, do you know, or are just fucking with us? I might say “Who the fuck cares?”… “But”, you might reply, “don’t you even have some personal opinion on the matter?”  Suppose you actually cornered me in my shop with a flamethrower and said to me point blank:  “Vincent, you Motherfucker! Stop equivocating! Do you or do you not believe the Gods exist?” What would I answer? This would depend on whether I happened to be in a more Western or more Eastern mood at the time I was asked, as I have a foot in both worlds. If I were in a more Western mood (and abided in the duality of existence versus nonexistence), then, since I tend to be a Platonist, I would probably answer, “Yes, the Gods exist, and they don’t believe in you”. But suppose I were in an Eastern mood? If you asked a Zen-Master whether the Gods exist, he would probably give you a good blow with his stick. Now I have a baseball bat, but being of a somewhat kinder disposition, I would probably just smile at you (perhaps in a somewhat condescending fashion) and offer you a cup of Coffee, perhaps a cigarette, and wait till you went away all mad and disgruntled.

Stay Gold Everyone, and Happy Holidays…..

Sources:  Logical Positivism (, The Tao is Silent by: Raymond M. Smullyan, Nominalism and Realism by:Andrea Borghini

Art Source-The Council of the Gods by:Peter Paul Rubens

DO THE GODS EXIST? And how many of them can I cram into my star wars lunchbox? was originally published on The Hidden Left Hand